Practical Doc

PDQ Blog


Welcome to PDQ, Practical Doc’s quick and sometimes quirky look at rural medicine. We’d like your take on it too, so comments and contributions to PDQ are welcome.

PDQ features content from CURIOS: A partnership between the University of Calgary and RPAP.

BBC: how do we avoid the antibiotics apocalypse?

I saw this on the BBC News feed: Every year, at least 700,000 people die from drug-resistant infections. It is why government scientists have described antibiotic resistance as one of the greatest global threats of the 21st Century. So what are people doing to try to avert the so-called antibiotics ...

BBC News: Aphantasia: ‘I can’t visualise my own children’

I never would have imagined this…er…wait… Worth being aware of, if it is as common as 2% prevalence. And apparently, many who suffer from this are not aware of it. Aphantasia: ‘I can’t visualise my own children’Two in every 100 people have no ability to visualise images in their own heads – be...

Are animal models leading us astray?

Here is an interesting article in New Scientist today… https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23230973-700-man-or-mouse/ Man or mouse? Why drug research has taken the wrong turning http://www.newscientist.com Drug research has got so hooked on working with genetically modified animals that it ...

Tasmanian devil milk fights superbugs

I saw this on the BBC News App and thought you should see it: Tasmanian devil milk fights superbugsMilk from Tasmanian devils could offer up a useful weapon against antibiotic-resistant superbugs, according to Australian researchers. And anyone who has come across these devils knows how fierce they ...

A new technique for fast and safe collection of urine in newborns.

This great tip was passed on to me by R Ram, from the St Paul’s conference this year. A really simple way to get neonates to pee on demand. Remarkably effective and avoids the contamination problems of bag collections. Worth grabbing the original article but essentially, it comes down to: &#16...

What you eat when you’re sick may determine if you’ll get better

It looks like the old adage of “Feed a cold, starve a fever”, and other home remedies such as chicken soup, may have some scientific basis to them after all. This is an interesting piece in New Scientist. You may need to connect but no charge. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2105986...

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